Art Bozeman

For artists and art fans in Bozeman and beyond

Charles Ross lecture on Star Axis project

Charles Ross, an internationally recognized sculptor who is known for connecting art and architecture and his art of light, will lecture about his Star Axis project at 5:30 p.m. Friday, April 16, in room 339 of Leon Johnson Hall on the Montana State University campus. Ross’ lecture, “Star Axis: Sculpture to Observe the Stars,” is sponsored by the MSU School of Architecture and is free and open to the public.

“Charles is extremely well-known in the art world and comes out of a tradition of land art, which is particular to America, and uses the specifics of land and place,” said John Brittingham, a professor in the MSU School of Architecture. “Most of his work is concerned with light, which is something we’re famous for in Montana. He’s been working on his project, ‘Star Axis,’ for more than 30 years. (His lecture) is something that’s relatively unprecedented for MSU.”

Ross is a sculptor based in Las Vegas, N.M., and New York City, whose subject is light itself. His “Star Axis,” an earth/sky sculpture and “naked-eye observatory” that he has been working on for more than 30 years, made him a part of the Land Art movement that began in the 1960s and ’70s. Located in the New Mexico desert, “Star Axis” was conceived in 1971 and is now nearing completion. This earthwork is on an Egyptian or pre-Columbian scale. It includes a solar pyramid. From inside it, the Earth’s rotation can be observed. The central element of Star Axis is the Star Tunnel, which is cut into the side of a mesa with an ascending 11-story stairway in perfect alignment with the axis of the earth. As visitors climb the stairs of the star tunnel, they pass through 26,000 years of Earth/star history, viewing distant past and future aspects of Earth’s shifting alignment with the stars.

More info on the MSU News site.

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