Art Bozeman

For artists and art fans in Bozeman and beyond


Photography of Butte by Cornish and van Coller

The exhibit Butte: Common & Private Spaces represents an ongoing and collaborative effort between Bozeman photographers Dan Cornish and Ian van Coller. Their goal is to explore the culture of Butte by investigating the dynamic landscape of the town and its people as it emerges from an identity deeply rooted in copper mining. While these projects provide distinct perspectives of Butte, the shared focus on local history and narrative reveal the simultaneous stillness and reemergence of a distinct cultural identity. The work is a selection of photographs taken from February 2009 to the present. Ian van Coller is a professor of photography at Montana State University, Bozeman; Daniel Cornish graduated in photography from MSU and is a Butte native.

Meet the photographers at their fall reception in the Weaver Room on Thursday, September 8, 7 – 9 pm, with a gallery talk at 7:30 pm. There is also a gallery talk Sept. 1st, 6 pm, with reception 5:30 – 7 pm. The exhibit will remain on view through October 6. For further information or to schedule a tour, please contact Ellen Ornitz, ellen@theemerson.org.


Emerson exhibits @ July Art Walk

In the Mud Room is an ongoing show featuring high-end and affordable contemporary ceramics by Emerson teachers and staff. Reception Friday, July 8th at 5-8 pm. Exhibit artists are teachers Ryan Mitchell: functional porcelain; Vanessa Rogers: sculptural porcelain vessels; Carl Sheehan: functional high fire stoneware:: Shaila Sorenson: primitive fired hand dug clay; and Emerson staff Ellen Ornitz: porcelain & mixed media sculpture; Mike Weix: terracotta vessel.

In the Lobby is an exhibit of work by Stevi Lynn and Sally Hickman, who will describe their photo transfer and encaustic processes in a gallery talk at 6 pm.

The ongoing show at the Jessie Wilber Gallery is Contemporary Figurative Ceramics.

The Weaver Room Gallery is showing Butte: Common & Private Spaces, an ongoing and collaborative effort between Bozeman photographers Dan Cornish and Ian van Coller. The work is a selection of photographs taken from February 2009 to the present. Ian van Coller is a professor of photography at Montana State University, Bozeman; Daniel Cornish graduated in photography from MSU and is a Butte native.

The Ecce Gallery will hold a reception for A Visual Feast: DeWeese Family Art Show. Talk with artists Tina, Josh, and Gretchen DeWeese starting at 6:30.


MSU faculty photography show

Montana State University is proud to present Matter, an exhibition of  photographic works from the MSU School of Film & Photography photo faculty.  The works will be on exhibit Monday 20 September – Thursday 7  October, 2010, at the Helen E. Copeland Gallery in Haynes Hall.  The gallery is open Monday through Friday 9AM – 5PM. Please join us for an opening reception on Thursday 23 September, 7PM – 9PM, at the Helen E. Copeland Gallery.

Contributing artists include: Christina Z. Anderson, Kyle Bajakian, Charlie Capp, Rudi Dietrich, John Hooton, Jonathan Long, Alexis Pike, Lucia Ricciardelli, Ian van Coller, and Daniel Wise.


Ian van Coller photographs @ Holter Museum of Art

The Holter Museum of Art in Helena will be exhibiting Interior Relations, a thought-provoking collection of sixteen photographic portraits by Bozeman photographer Ian van Coller, beginning on February 27 and showing through April 19. The richly-colorful yet sometimes somber photographs depict South African domestic workers in their employers’ homes, at often unmanageable distances from the workers’ own homes and families. Taken together, the portraiture explores the complexities of identity that all South Africans face post-Apartheid. A reception with the artist is scheduled from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m. on February 27.

For the project, van Coller asked the subjects to wear their favorite clothing and accessories, rather than the plain housecoats and jumpsuits that typify their jobs as housecleaners and childcare workers and gardeners. He encouraged each to become active participants in making their portraits, to facilitate expression of their own aesthetics and identities within the contradictory context. Viewers of the portrait series might initially mistake the subjects as property owners, but upon further attention to the accompanying wall texts will confront the clash of realities permeating that country today—in a fashion parallel to the artist’s own experience.

On Saturday, March 7, van Coller will give an Artist Talk at 10:30 a.m. Then at 11:15 a.m., he will participate in the panel discussion, Creating Ourselves: On Race and Culture, with Holter Cultural Crossroads Artist in Residence Michael Dixon and others, moderated by IR reporter Martin Kidston. Visit holtermuseum.org for directions and other information. Van Coller’s work can also be seen at www.ianvancoller.com.


Ian van Coller: “Interior Relations” opens in San Francisco

Ian van Coller, Professor of Photography at MSU, has a solo show in San Francisco at the Rayko Photo Center. The exhibition runs November 5 – December 6, with an opening November 7. Some images from the show, photographed in his native South Africa, have been previously seen in Bozeman. For more of this and other work by Van Coller, see his web site.

Elina Makitla

Elina Makitla

Interior Relations explores the deep fault lines between the country’s public democratic ideals and the ongoing racial and economic inequality that circumscribes the lived experiences of many black South African women. Many of the contradictions evident in South Africa’s transition to democracy are encapsulated within white households that employ black and coloured domestic workers, often housing them in segregated living quarters on their property. These households, simultaneously private spaces for employers and public spaces for the employees, are ultimately political spaces where race, class and gender inequalities are negotiated. Interior Relations is a portrait series focused specifically on female domestic workers—nannies and maids—who continue to embody this daily repertoire of inequalities.